Social Story Sharing

Episode 016 Stories Are Models — Interview with Lynne McNeill, Professor of Folklore

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Stories are models of how to live.  We often look to how others do things in order to determine how we should do things. Stories are often the vehicle in which these models are exchanged. Today we learn that when our life stories don’t turn out in a way that fits our cultural models we can listen to stories from others to find additional worthwhile ways to create our lives. Today I interview Lynne McNeill, a professor of Folklore at Utah State University. Come along and listen to her considerable expertise in story and what we can learn from becoming aware of our stories, the stories of those around us, and the co-creation of meaning that results.

Podcast Interview: Lynne McNeill, Utah State University, English Department

See her TEDx talk here: http://tedx.usu.edu/portfolio-items/lynne-mcneill/

About the author, Lori

Author of four books and over 100 magazine and newspaper articles, Lori found a fascination with the personal narrative during her master's degree research in Folklore at Utah State University. Coming to understand the nuance and power of story, the automatic but unrecognized uses, the cultural curtains that story pulls back for us to peak behind, she let her excitement spill over into her own journey of personal empowerment and the excitement of sharing it all with others.

2 Comments

  1. Sandi on January 4, 2017 at 8:25 PM

    Very effective podcast. Interesting for for anyone trying to find their own voice and understand/rewrite their story as well as anyone interested in the theory and practice of story ritual. The part about cultural expectations really resonated with me. Within postmodern western cultures, I learned while young that some very real parts of my story would be met with criticism, disdain, incredulity, and suppression…so I began to guard those aspects of my story/experiences to myself. However, as I ventured into the world as an adult, I discovered that my story/experiences were not only well received by many cultures but actually earned me a place as a sympathetic outsider; a kindred spirit returned home, if you will. This taught me to ignore the judgements of those who don’t understand my story and the courage and sense of belonging to be myself anyways and to dwell where I choose, not just where I was born.

  2. Michael Christensen on January 11, 2017 at 5:26 PM

    That was enjoyable. Thanks!

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